Turkish

Turkish also referred to as Istanbul Turkish, is the most widely spoken of the Turkic languages, with around 10–15 million native speakers in Southeast and 60–65 million native speakers in Western Asia. Outside of Turkey, significant smaller groups of speakers exist in Germany, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Northern Cyprus, Greece, the Caucasus, and other parts of Europe and Central Asia. Cyprus has requested that the European Union add Turkish as an official EU language, even though Turkey is not a member state.

The earliest known Old Turkic inscriptions are the three monumental Orkhon inscriptions found in modern Mongolia. Erected in honor of the prince Kul Tigin and his brother Emperor Bilge Khagan, these date back to the second Turk Kaghanate.

With the Turkic expansion during Early Middle Ages, peoples speaking Turkic languages spread across Central Asia, covering a vast geographical region stretching from Siberia and to Europe and the Mediterranean. The Seljuqs of the Oghuz Turks, in particular, brought their language, Oghuz into Anatolia during the 11th century. Also during the 11th century, an early linguist of the Turkic languages, Mahmud al-Kashgari from the Kara-Khanid Khanate, published the first comprehensive Turkic language dictionary and map of the geographical distribution of Turkic speakers in the Compendium of the Turkic Dialects.

Following the adoption of Islam c. 950 by the Kara-Khanid Khanate and the Seljuq Turks, who are both regarded as the ethnic and cultural ancestors of the Ottomans, the administrative language of these states acquired a large collection of loanwords from Arabic and Persian. Turkish literature during the Ottoman period, particularly Divan poetry, was heavily influenced by Persian, including the adoption of poetic meters and a great quantity of imported words.

After the foundation of the modern state of Turkey and the script reform, the Turkish Language Association (TDK) was established in 1932 under the patronage of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, with the aim of conducting research on Turkish. One of the tasks of the newly established association was to initiate a language reform to replace loanwords of Arabic and Persian origin with Turkish equivalents. By banning the usage of imported words in the press, the association succeeded in removing several hundred foreign words from the language.

Owing to this sudden change in the language, older and younger people in Turkey started to differ in their vocabularies. While the generations born before the 1940s tend to use the older terms of Arabic or Persian origin, the younger generations favor new expressions.

 

ProMosaik Trans offers translations from and into Turkish in the following fields:

 

  • Law and Contract Law
  • Patents
  • Marketing and Advertising
  • Technology
  • Science
  • Literature
  • Cultural Sciences

 

Turkish Proverb:Herkes kendi yıldızının demircisi” – Every man is the smith of his own fortune.

 

ProMosaik Trans Istanbul offers the following language combinations from and into Turkish:

 

English – Turkish

 

German – Turkish

 

Italian – Turkish

 

French – Turkish

 

Spanish – Turkish

 

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ProMosaik Trans also offers editing, interpreting, proofreading, and transcription services in Turkish.

 

 

With ProMosaik interlanguage you can also study Turkish with us online!

 

Send your translation requests into or from Turkish, with the documents you need to be translated to info@promosaik.com