(English) Hindi

Hindi, or Modern Standard Hindi is a standardised and Sanskritised register of the Hindustani language. Along with the English language, Hindi written in the Devanagari script is the official language of India. It is one of the 22 scheduled languages of the Republic of India. However, it is not the national language of India because no language was given such a status in the Indian constitution.

 

Hindi is the lingua franca of the Hindi belt, and to a lesser extent the whole of India (usually in a simplified or pidginized variety such as Bazaar Hindustani or Haflong Hindi). Outside India, several other languages are recognized officially as “Hindi” but do not refer to the Standard Hindi language described here and instead descend from other dialects of Hindustani, such as Awadhi and Bhojpuri. Such languages include Fiji Hindi, which is official in Fiji, and Caribbean Hindustani, which is a recognized language in Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and Suriname. Apart from specialized vocabulary, spoken Hindi is mutually intelligible with Urdu, another recognized register of Hindustani.

 

As a linguistic variety, Hindi is the fourth most-spoken first language in the world, after Mandarin, Spanish and English. Alongside Urdu as Hindustani, it is the third most-spoken language in the world, after Mandarin and English.

 

Like other Indo-Aryan languages, Hindi is a direct descendant of an early form of Vedic Sanskrit, through Sauraseni Prakrit and Śauraseni Apabhraṃśa (from Sanskrit apabhraṃśa “corrupted”), which emerged in the 7th century A.D.

 

Modern Standard Hindi is based on the Khariboli dialect, the vernacular of Delhi and the surrounding region, which came to replace earlier prestige dialects such as Awadhi, Maithili (sometimes regarded as separate from the Hindi dialect continuum) and Braj. Urdu – another form of Hindustani – acquired linguistic prestige in the later Mughal period (1800s), and underwent significant Persian influence. Modern Hindi and its literary tradition evolved towards the end of the 18th century. However, modern Hindi’s earlier literary stages before standardization can be traced to the 16th century. In the late 19th century, a movement to further develop Hindi as a standardised form of Hindustani separate from Urdu took form. In 1881, Bihar accepted Hindi as its sole official language, replacing Urdu, and thus became the first state of India to adopt Hindi. Modern Standard Hindi is one of the youngest Indian languages in this regard.

 

On 14 September 1949, the Constituent Assembly of India adopted Hindi written in the Devanagari script as the official language of the Republic of India replacing Urdu’s previous usage in British India.

 

ProMosaik Trans offers translations from and into Hindi in the following fields:

 

Law and Contract Law

 

Patents

 

Marketing and Advertising

 

Technology

 

Science

 

Literature

 

Cultural Sciences

 

Hindi proverb: जंगल में मोर नाचा किस ने देखा ? - Who saw a peacock dance in the woods?

 

Meaning: If you got it, flaunt it.

 

ProMosaik Trans Istanbul offers the following language combinations from and into Hindi:

 

English – Hindi

 

Italian – Hindi

 

Spanish – Hindi

 

German – Hindi

 

French – Hindi

 

 hindi

 

 

 

 

ProMosaik Trans also offers editing, interpreting, proofreading, and transcription services in Hindi.

 

With ProMosaik interlanguage you can also study Hindi with us online!

 

Send your translation requests into or from Hindi, with the documents you need to be translated to info@promosaik.com